Category Archives: Talent Management

The ABC of Performance

 

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Ram Charan wrote in his book execution – the future companies are the ones who will execute well in Strategy, People, and Operations. While strategy and operations are very well defined the challenge has always been in the crucial link “people” – aligning them is the key to organizational success.

Performance Management is a subject where sometimes process’ overwrite people and culture. And somehow we create an environment wherein performance of an individual is judged like a Miss Universe pageant, where you are asked the most clichéd question – why should you be the miss universe and the participants compete how they posses superpowers to heal the world.

 

With so much cacophony around performance management – at qilo we call it performance enablement, the organizations have to first create an ecosystem for an individual to perform and we call it performance ABC driving attitudes, behaviors, and capability.

 

Even if you have best your strategy and process’ in place if your people do not have the right attitude display the right behaviors and are capable to execute their role – growth will never happen.

 

I have heard a lot of leaders talking about lack of readiness in their organization – actually it’s not readiness its fear of change and fuzzy vision of future.

 

So what should be done? My learning so far.

 

1)   Question the design of the performance management framework – it is meant to build leaderboards or create an ecosystem for people to perform

2)   Keep it simple – Business imperatives (strategic) next the role I play in achieving them and how I am doing it

3)   Pay for potential – Build the team that will take you to achieve success in future or lives in the past glory?

4)   Feedback – Tell me how can I improve and do my job better now! Not when I have done it

5)   One size does not fit all – Try to make your performance design align to people, not a stiff upper lip

6)   It’s not a checklist – Do not run a process just for the heck of running it, define the core why you need to do it?

7)   Enroll people not force them into a process – enrollment has larger powers and drives accountability

8)   Start from the top – leaders have to walk the talk, there is simply no way out

9)   Highlight and showcase the positive behaviors even if they are low in numbers glorify them for others to see and follow

10) Make it transparent – there is nothing grey here – it should be either black or white

 

Bring the change now, if you don’t your competitor will.

 

Blitzscaling 13: Shishir Mehrotra on Scaling YouTube and The 10 Things That Matter

This is my eleventh blog on the notes and my interpretations on the Blitzscaling sessions. In the fall of 2015, Reid Hoffman began taking session called Technology-Enabled Blitzscaling at Stanford University.Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale. And its also about why organization culture is important for Blitzscaling Because when you’re growing an organization very fast, you have to make people accountable to each other on a horizontal or peer-to-peer basis, and not just vertically and top-down through the hierarchy.

Session 2 notes can be found here. Session 3 notes can be found here. Session 4 notes can be found here.Session 5 notes can be found here.Session 6 I haven’t covered. Session 7 notes can be found here. Session 8 notes can be found here. Session 9 notes can be found here. Session 10 notes here.  Session 11 notes here. Session 12 notes are here

In session 13,  Shishir Mehrotra, who helped guide YouTube through hyper growth shared 10 things that matter when you scale your early stage organization.

10things that matter

  1. Tailwind is an aviation industry term which means wind pushing the aircraft from its back; resulting in the higher speed of aircraft; opposite of tailwind is “headwind”, which means air is pushing the aircraft from its front, resulting in the slower speed. When applying this term to start-up world; “tailwind” means your start-up is or will be riding an existing wave of change, for example:-early stage businesses working in renewable energy which we taking advantage of society becoming sensitive about the environment.  “Highwind” means your start-up is or will be moving against a reluctance towards a change. for example:- Cloud based businesses 10 years ago was struggling to prove their point to CIO’s that cloud based hosting is way cheaper that on-premise server hosting. Success doesn’t matter whether your early stage business is tailwind or headwind. But being in tailwind, you can avoid many mistakes which headwind start-up businesses has done in past.
  2.  Purpose is one of the core dimensions that motivates people to do what they do. Mastery and autonomy are the other two dimensions. Purpose means connect what you do and why you do it. If you don’t communicate about your purpose, people will keep doing the transactions, which will never lead to WOW for your customers.
  3. Thesis matters means you have to focus on core & simple insights of your domain. Discovering those simple insights is going to take hell lot of time.
  4. Deciding which metrics to measure is very important. At Coca-Cola rather than measuring their market share vs Pepsi, someone at Coca-Cola suggested measuring Coca-Cola share in customer’s stomach. That measure resulted in Coca-Cola investing in packaged food products & drinking water. At YouTube, Shishir and team shifted measuring “Watch time Of YouTube” vs  “Watch time Of Television”. The previous metric that was measured at YouTube was the number of video’s uploaded to ad revenue to the quantity of ad’s coming to office. YouTube set a goal to increase its watch time from 100 million to 1 billion hours of watch time for Television. So setting the right type of metric to measure helps you to accelerate growth in the right direction. Pro tip: Use OKR to measure the progress on your business metrics
  5. Its often hard to make decisions in your business when you don’t have enough data. So you need more and more data to simplify your decision-making. The best decisions are those which simplify your life in making next 10 decisions.
  6.  Every business is a part of eco-system doesn’t matter how big you are. And there are set of people in that ecosystem on you have relied on to make you grow. And it’s very easy to presume their incentives if you don’t ask.Don’t presume things, collect data and/or ask hard questions, you might get more insights on this. For YouTube, their ecosystem is content producers. And YouTube worked hard to come up with the model on how to incentives the content producers.
  7. Value Matters as you grow. Think about your values well in advance before you become big enough that you can’t work on those & you can’t explain them or inculcate them in your employees.
  8. Talent matters alot for growing your organization. Divide your entire landscape of talent into 4 level as follows and compare them on their performance to decide who to take forward and whom to work with and who should be those who get out of the system.

Level 1) Executors: People who do day to day execution

Level 2) How to execute: People who give instruction on how to execute the things

Level 3) Solution to work on: These are the people who identify the solution to problems                       and priorities to execute

Level  4) Which Problems to solve:  These are the people who figure out which problems to solve

When you are starting a company having a small team, people do everything. And if you got a people, specially co-founders who cannot think at all the level, it’s not good. But as you grow, you need people specific for each level. Where companies go wrong is when they compare the performance of people at level 1 with level 2, this means you lack transparency in your organization about the roles. Define proper roles and measure the performance of people among same roles.

9) Your roles matters in an organization and if that role is impacting the work of many people in the organization, you better avoid micromanage your people, or become a dictator or become a one who over empathizes.

10) When you are setting up your goal’s & objectives, your team members should have exposure to the bigger picture. You as CEO have to align every individual with the higher purpose of the organization. This will result in high level of commitment within your organization.

 

CEO vs Post 2008 Workforce

“What’s wrong with the kids coming out of college, why they behave like by working for the company, they are doing a great service to you”, said the career banker, an entrepreneur and ex-CEO of one of the FinTech company, an arm of largest telco network in India. He continued “Don’t they realize that they should respect the job they have got and should be working hard to excel in their careers”. I can correlate with his pain. As a CEO or as an entrepreneur, you want to execute things faster.  And its people in your organization who can help you achieve that.

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I was looking at the issue of “getting work done” especially in Indian context. To analyze this, I have divided the workforce into 3 generations, from “1965 to 1998”, from “1999 to 2008” and “Post 2008”.

The generation who joined the workforce after 1965’s till 1998, their basic need was to put enough food on the table that family can have it the entire month.The government was the major job creator and India has started moving from socialist to a capitalist economy.

From 1999 to 2008, people who joined the workforce are interested in making sure family moves from lower middle class to upper middle class. And growing sectors like IT & IT enabled services, Banking and Pharma helped many people achieve this. The job priorities are to get more and more money, bonuses, and higher level roles in the company. In a way, this generation was high on extrinsic motivation than intrinsic motivations.

Post-2008 workforce is prominently the part of the knowledge economy. For them, enough food was already there on the table. For post-2008 workforce generation, their needs and priorities are bit different. They want the purpose of their life to be largely fulfilled by their work. They are delaying marriages so that they can attain a certain level of achievement in their career. Thankfully it will also help India in controlling the growing population. Young generation today are much more career-focused than the earlier generation and are much more demanding of their employers. They want to listen more from their CEO about the purpose of the organization, from their department heads and managers where they are heading to as a unit. They want more and more autonomy at work and coaching to attain the mastery.  The minute they see the purpose of this organization is not meaningful enough, they are not getting enough coaching & flexibility to attain the mastery they will switch to your competitor. And it’s not that they don’t want money, but they are far less greedy than earlier generation. They are still high on extrinsic motivation, but very high on intrinsic motivations. To get a detailed understanding on this, I will highly recommend you to read “Drive” by Daniel Pink.

As CEO and as an organization, you want to get work done. And to get that done with utmost excellence in execution and quality. And you want to identify people in your company who can take your vision & priorities to next level.  You are absolutely right in your ask. But the ways in which you want to get things done from post-2008 generation has just changed. The attention span of digitally enabled generation is far shorter than previous one. By

  • Communicating you purpose, beliefs and expected behaviors,
  • Defining right kind of performance metrics transparently,
  • Enhancing your managerial effectiveness and
  • by giving balanced flexibility, you will be able to take your organization to next level of growth.

The Younger generation doesn’t mind putting up extended hours of effort for your vision & purpose, only ask is to communicate that vision & purpose in a colloquial way and to make them feel the part of it.

Summary of Learnings:

  • Post-2008 work generation doesn’t want corporate emails from your PA’s about your organization purpose, progress, and expected behaviors.
  • Town Halls don’t work. Ask your leadership team to find a more colloquial way of communication.
  • Define performance metrics transparently.
  • Enhance your managerial effectiveness and help them become better coaches

Blitzscaling 11: Patrick Collison on Hiring at Stripe and the Role of a Product-Focused CEO

This is my ninth blog on the notes and my interpretations on the Blitzscaling sessions. In the fall of 2015, Reid Hoffman began taking session called Technology-Enabled Blitzscaling at Stanford University.Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale. And its also about why organization culture is important for Blitzscaling Because when you’re growing an organization very fast, you have to make people accountable to each other on a horizontal or peer-to-peer basis, and not just vertically and top-down through the hierarchy.

Session 2 notes can be found here. Session 3 notes can be found here. Session 4 notes can be found here.Session 5 notes can be found here.Session 6 I haven’t covered. Session 7 notes can be found here. Session 8 notes can be found here. Session 9 notes can be found here. Session 10 notes here.

Patrick Collison is the co-founder and CEO of Stripe that allows both private individuals and businesses to accept payments over the Internet.In session 11, Patrick shared learning of being a CEO and production guy. Here are the session notes and my interpretations on the insights shared.

  1. For your hiring and other processes, people just copy paste processes of bigger companies.People keep following it assuming that it will work for them. For example- Google hire’s people from top universities with highest GPA’s . This might work for Google, but probably will not work for your company. Even ex-CPO of Google accepted this that there is no correlation between higher GPA and higher performance at work.
  2. Think and take as much time as possible in hiring right guys. Effort spent is worth because that way you will hire the one’s that will suit your organisation culture.
  3. If you get one great A player, there is a high possibility that your next hire will also be an A player.
  4. If you are an engineer and don’t know how to do business development, hire or get a guy on board as a co-founder to do that. At Stripe, because co-founders didn’t know how to sell, they hired BD guys very early who has helped them crack big accounts.
  5. CEO and founding team needs to be involved in the day to day decision’s on the product, at least for the first 5 to 7 years. Because no one else can better understand what should go in the product to solve customer need than founders.
  6. The reason why product innovation stops in growing start-up is that of people who you hire to support growth adds complexity to the system called the organisation. With more people comes slower decision making and its lowers down the sense of accountability of innovation.To support innovation and keep building new things, create a separate small team of 3 to 4 people to execute the new innovations. And the decision of what kind of new product, idea or feature should this team focus on should be based on NPV or net economic value of that new thing.
  7. Talk to your prospective customers base as many times as possible before you start building or before you ship the product out of the building. At Stripe, for every new line or feature of the product, they talked to the developer community(their customer base) before the new things go in production.
  8. As you grow, most of your time as a founder will be spent on communicating with your different teams and defining priorities for them. The transitioning from “Thinker + Doer” to “Thinker + Getting People Think + Getting People Do” is very difficult. And that’s where you have to invest your time in defining processes.
  9. As company grow, founders and CEO need to shift the way they communicate. You can no longer put all those people in the room to talk to them. You have to pick up the habit of writing in an informal way about what you are thinking, how business is going, what are your learning and even failures that you are encountering in your journey. Written words have much more clear and longer impact. And it gives your employee more one-on-one feeling than those town halls and virtual meetings.

Blitzscaling 10: Selina Tobaccowala on Building a Global Business at SurveyMonkey

This is my eighth blog on the notes and my interpretations on the Blitzscaling sessions. In the fall of 2015, Reid Hoffman began taking session called Technology-Enabled Blitzscaling at Stanford University.Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale. And its also about why organization culture is important for Blitzscaling Because when you’re growing an organization very fast, you have to make people accountable to each other on a horizontal or peer-to-peer basis, and not just vertically and top-down through the hierarchy.

Session 2 notes can be found here. Session 3 notes can be found here. Session 4 notes can be found here.Session 5 notes can be found here.Session 6 I haven’t covered. Session 7 notes can be found here. Session 8 notes can be found here. Session 9 notes can be found here.

Selina Tobaccowala was President and chief technology officer at SurveyMonkey. She has contributed alot in taking Survey Monkey global. In session 10, she shared the insights on how she managed the technology and tech people @ SurveyMonkey.Here are the session notes and my interpretations on the insights shared.

  1. When you architect your software application, not only it should scale on handling traffic, but it should also be able to handle more developers working on it. This basically means that if tomorrow you have to add more technology people in the team, they should be able to work on your code.
  2. Even if you have ended up with software code base which is monolithic( All software layers are mixed), rather than re-creating the system in new technology, pick up the part of the system which is most difficult and try to rearrange and refactor those blocks in existing architecture.
  3. When you have to take your SaaS platform globally
    1. Localisation- which means displaying data and numbers in local language, number system, and currency
    2. Integrating different payment gateways
    3. Your messaging
    4. More technology and customer support people
  4. A/B testing is important part to validate & improve the user experience of your web and mobile app
  5.  For subscription-based businesses like SurveyMonkey, important metrics to measure is (a) Number of free subscribers (b) Number of subscribers converting from free to paid
  6. While hiring, focus on behavioural interviewing to reduce bias in selecting candidates. The question in behavioural interviewing aims at learning about your past behaviours in specific work situations. In a traditional interview, you ask general questions such as “Tell me about yourself.” In behavioural interviewing, questions will be like “How would you handle XYZ situation?” Try this in your next interview. At qilo, we have adopted this and it has helped me pick up really good team members.
  7. Finding up people who can help you scale up the things is damn hard. Pick up people who have both start-up and big company experience.As your company grows, keep people motivated, focused on their role/job & engaging them for the next level of the journey is a challenge.
  8. To reduce the churn rate, look at the insights from the data produced by your customer. And present that on the continues basis to right stakeholders in your company.
  9. A tech engineer looks for following qualities before joining a technology lead company:
    1. The product(s) should excite them as they will be spending many years in building and maintaining it.
    2. They will be getting the right mentor or people there to work with.
    3. Other that engineering, what other things they will learn their.
  10. Anything that is critical to run your business should be in-house. If its outsourced, bring it in-house as soon as possible
  11. Once you have money, hire a BI analyst who looks at the data and tells you: “what you have built”, “how well it was doing” and “how well its is doing”
  12. Service oriented architecture helps you to scale the software system. And as well as helps you to strcture your backend and frontend engineering teams in the proper way.
  13. People management is not for everyone. Put only those people to managerial positions who can serve their teams by acting as servants. For people who want to remain technical, define a roadmap so that they can see how they will grow in your company.
  14. Successful manager’s get satisfaction by influencing people. Technology people get satisfaction by deliverng the product.
  15. Plan every quarter what you want to achieve. And track the progress on that every week.If you don’t do it when you are small, adopting that when you will scale will be much more difficult. On tool to implement this is OKR.
  16. Reduce the time it takes to take your code from keyboard to production. To achieve this automate the deployment process.

Moving from performance management to enablement (Part 1)

If an organization is spending 2 million hours of effort on measuring performance, an annual activity that’s doesn’t make sense to anyone, we have strong reason to relook at the cost and effort spent on this activity. The countless number of hours spent on filling self-reviews, manager review forms, meeting, arranging and collating performance data is certainly not justified.

During my corporate career, my team and I always expected two outcomes from performance review (mid-year and annual):

  1. Feedback from my manager on how I have done
  2. What will be the increment in my salary

While both the reasons are strong enough to hold my team’s and my interest in performance reviews, it was always disengaging. HR, Business Unit Heads, and team managers have to follow up endlessly with people to get self-reviews completed. It’s a strong enough evidence that people are not looking forward to this annual ritual. Further, a study by Willis Tower Waston fond that ONLY 20% of employers believes that merit pay is effective in driving higher levels of individual performance in their organizations.  Here are the top 5 reasons of dis-engagement with performance review process:-

  1. Performance management process is not employee centric: The yearly performance review process and system are designed to get top 10, average 70 and bottom 20 percentile of people to facilitate C&B (Compensation & Benefit). To achieve this activity, organization’s and HR leaders forgot to put employees and managers in the center of doing performance review process(now day’s it’s also called as design thinking). As an employee, if I know that outcome of the annual performance management process is money, my projections about my performance will always be HIGH. And the manager will be more focused on justifying the rating and/or percentage of salary hike. In this all, giving actual feedback to the employee on how she has performed and how she can improve in future takes back stage.
  2. Measurement on KRA/KPI/questioners which doesn’t make sense: KRA’s are static in nature; today’s business world is way too dynamic. Team’s priorities and targets keep changing on day to day, month to month and quarter to quarter basis. And team members are not able to correlate their day to day work with assigned KRA’s and KPI’s. Even if they are able to correlate, how much progress they have done to achieve the KPI(s) cannot be measured quantitatively and qualitatively. Don’t believe me, ask your employees. At the end, the current process leaves the judgment of how well I have performed on manager’s wisdom.
  3. Lack of clear communication on expectations and what should be done to grow: When was the last time your organization has clearly communicated to your employee on competencies they need to get better on. And which competencies they need to acquire to grow to next level. Team members often come up with an assumption that they are ready for next role, without realizing whether they are even ready for that or not. And managers don’t have enough data to tell the team member why they are not getting promoted to the next level.
  4. Recency bias in evaluation: – How many times you have observed that when performance reviews and appraisals are approaching, team members suddenly become more proactive, disciplined, showcase best of their behaviors and start delivering things on time beyond expectations. I still remember one such incident: One of my team members who was sitting in different office location started sharing the status update on time, without follow-ups, was calling me on regular basis to tell me how lucky she is being in this assignment. As a manager, you will tend to take the decision based on recent events and perceptions.
  5. No transparency: – Organizations lacks transparency in the entire performance management process with too much dependency on manager’s decision. While manager’s role cannot be denied in the process, it’s the employee peer’s who know how this person has performed throughout the year and whether she is a good team player or not. And though increment has always depended on the how the company has performed and on macroeconomic conditions, managers give feedback to justifying the bell curve rating or to justify the rating communicated to her from the higher management.

The way you measure performance defines the core culture of your organization and it will define how your people will perform in the future.

In part 2 of this post, I will share how you can take the journey of moving your organization from performance measurement process to performance enablement process.

Summary:

  1. Performance management is dead, future belongs to enabling the performance.
  2. Current Performance management process is not employee centric.
  3. Managers lags data of employee performance through the year, leading to recency bais in evaluation
  4. If done right, enabling performance will accelerate business growth

Part-2 of this article can be found here.